r410a refrigerant recharge

What Will Happen to R22 and How it Affects You

Published on May 17, 2016

Updated: June 14, 2018
If your air conditioner was installed before 2010 and you don’t know what R22 is then you should probably find out more. R22 refrigerant is a chemical that keeps the air coming from your air conditioning system cool, so it’s undoubtedly incredibly critical. Most air conditioning units older than 10 years have an AC refrigerant called R22 that’s commonly known as Freon*, and is noted by the EPA as HCFC-22. In this blog, we’ll use the name R22. This refrigerant was introduced in the 1950s and became the predominant AC refrigerant in the residential heating and cooling industry.

The Montreal Protocol

Several decades later the world realized that R22 refrigerant was aiding in the depletion of the Earth’s ozone layer. Not a great thing. So, the U.S. EPA, in cooperation with other agencies and groups around the world, started a phase out of lots of ozone-depleting agents as part of an international agreement known as the Montreal Protocol. The regulation lists many HCFCs and CFCs (different types of refrigerants that deplete the ozone layer), but R22 is considered one of the worst offenders.

Timeline and R22 phase out progress in 2018

In 2003, the phase out of R22 production and imports commenced. By the beginning of 2010 the production and import of R22 was reduced. However, servicing current, existing equipment is still allowed while there is an available supply of R22. To ensure the public’s compliance with the new law, all sales of R22 must be purchased by a certified technician. Production and import of R22 will be continually reduced by law until 2020, when all production and import will be eliminated. Only recycled R22 refrigerant will be accessible to service existing air conditioners after 2020.


R22 consumption allowance during phase out period

The graph above shows the EPA’s consumption allowance of R22 by percentage. The limits on R22 consumption were implemented in 2010 and follow a declining trend until 2020.

So how does this affect prices?

If you’re thinking that this sounds like a great case study for an economics professor teaching supply and demand, then you are correct. As you can imagine, older air conditioners could more frequently experience leaks and need repairs. Any units that are older than 2010 are more likely to use R22, which means there’s a lot more demand for it, and a reduced supply. Prices have only risen due to scarcity.

Recall that in order to buy R22, you’ll need to be an EPA-certified technician. So, the normal homeowner can’t purchase a cylinder themselves. Plus, there are some strict regulations now on how refrigerant must be reclaimed and recycled, which raises the price. This fee is passed on to the homeowner as companies have to cover the increased overhead associated with R22 repairs. There are requirements for importing, labeling, record keeping, reporting, destruction and reclaiming of R22 from existing systems.

So, how will this affect you?

The cost of R22 is considerably increasing because of the diminishing supply, and new refrigerant will no longer be available for use at all after 2020, except from recycled quantities.


Free HVAC for dummies ebook

If you’re thinking, “Holy cow, this is starting to sound expensive,” you’re right, it is. This is why when our professionals come out to assess your unit we look to see what refrigerant your unit uses, and lots of cases, we’ll advise an upgrade as a result of the increasing cost of sustaining an R22 air conditioner.

How do I know if my unit uses R22?

If your home has an air conditioning system that was built before 2010, your AC will probably have R22. However, if you installed your air conditioner after January 1, 2010, then your air conditioner may not have R22. You can find the type of refrigerant your system runs on by reading the appliance’s nameplate. This nameplate is typically found on the outdoor condenser of your central air conditioning system. If you don’t find it, you can grab your user’s manual. If that doesn’t work either, you can reach out to your local Service Experts center. If you have a maintenance agreement with us, we also have your information on hand and a tech can let you know right away if your unit uses R22.

Instead of Freon, use Puron

The industry has moved from R22 to R410a, which you may know by the brand name Puron. In the remainder this article, we’ll use the name R410a (although Puron is a well-known brand, there are other companies that make R410a). There are some key benefits to switching from an R22 air conditioning unit to one that uses R410a. It provides a higher safety rating and an ozone depletion rating of zero, and it performed slightly better on energy-efficiency tests than R22.


R22 drop-in replacement quote

The truth about “drop-ins” is that there is no “drop-in” solution where you simply swap out the refrigerant.

HVAC quote on R22 drop in replacements

You may have read about “drop-in” replacements for R22. We strongly recommend against this choice. Typically a homeowner who is concerned about the cost of replacing their unit seeks out an alternative, and this feels like an easy solution. It often costs the homeowner more money, and almost always voids the manufacturer warranty. The fact about “drop-ins” is that there is no “drop-in” solution where you simply swap out the refrigerant. The phrase “drop-in” is indicating retrofitting a air conditioner, which when done properly can cost the homeowner as much, or more, money than installing a new unit that uses R410a. In part, this is because different refrigerants work at different pressure levels and demand different parts to run, which results in the technician needing to replace the most expensive components of your system to work with the new refrigerant. If this critical step is skipped, your system will quickly stop operating, and you’ll be forced to install a new unit anyway.

Your manufacturer will possibly not pay for the parts to make this swap because retrofitting your AC system will likely void the warranty. It’s usually just a temporary fix, but buying a new upgraded AC system will probably benefit most homeowners in dependability, satisfaction, and long-term comfort.

It’s better to discuss pricing options with your HVAC provider if you’re worried about cost. At Service Experts Heating & Air Conditioning, we offer financing that makes a replacement doable, and we monitor for any manufacturer and utility rebates that would make it easier to swallow an unforeseen replacement. To reduce the chances of an emergency on a hot day, a lot of of our customers elect to do a pre-emptive replacement, and replace an old unit before it quits working. If you’re thinking the same thing, then you’re in good company!

If your unit was built after 2010, you’re probably safe

If your heating and air conditioning system was built after January 2010, the R22 phase out problem may not apply to you, because it’s probably that your system uses the new, approved replacement refrigerant, R410a. However, units installed after 2010 might use R22, so it’s wise to check with an HVAC Expert. You can always look for and the refrigerant type by reading the nameplate on your condenser (the condenser is the outside unit).


nameplate on an outside condenser unit

What do I do if my air conditioner uses R22?

To review, if your HVAC equipment was produced prior to January 2010, particularly if it’s older than a decade, you have these options:

  1. Shop for an upgraded, more environmentally-friendly system that uses R410a.
  2. Contact an expert to replace the parts in your current AC system to help make it compatible with an approved air conditioner refrigerant. This is not advised.
  3. Stick with using recycled R22 and burn through costs like it’s the ozone layer.

To be clear, the EPA regulates the production and use of this refrigerant, but not your unit. You are not required by the law to replace your air conditioner. Ultimately, your AC will stop working and it will need to be replaced, and only R410a units will be available for sale.

The most straightforward option is to buy a new, upgraded air conditioner, particularly if your current air conditioner is already more than 10 years old. Service Experts Heating & Air Conditioning has lots of financing options that help to meet your budget, and again, we look out for rebates from HVAC manufacturers and local utilities to help you out. New AC equipment will also be more efficient and present you superior comfort, helping to reduce your energy costs.


Take Advantage
We do have one more option available in select locations. To provide our customers with high-quality equipment and service at competitive rates, we started the Advantage Program, which is a worry-free program that provides HVAC equipment with a full coverage repair and maintenance plan for a low monthly price.


You could also choose the status quo and continue using recycled R22 air conditioning refrigerant for the time being. While this sounds like a great alternative, the cost of servicing old R22 A/C systems is starting to surpass several hundred dollars (easily a down payment on a new system). You may also see the prices increase as demand continues to rise on a substance that is no longer produced or widely available.

If you aren’t sure what type of AC refrigerant your air conditioning system uses, let us help. Call Service Experts Heating & Air Conditioning today and we can provide an inspection to confirm if you are currently using R22 and, if so, which option works best for you.

The good news

While making the switch to an approved AC refrigerant may be frustrating, it’s helping to save the ozone layer. These regulations will help defend the ozone layer in the Earth’s atmosphere, which helps block radiation from the sun and prevents serious illnesses, such as skin cancer. It’s not exaggerated to say that you, as a homeowner, are a big part of this by replacing an old R22 unit with a newer, ozone friendly unit.

If you have any questions, please contact us for a free, in-home consultation by filling out the form below.

*Freon is a registered trademark of the DuPont Corporation

Sources:
1.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2013/12/24/2013-29817/protection-of-stratospheric-ozone-adjustments-to-the-allowance-system-for-controlling-hcfc

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